New York, N.Y. – The award-winning architecture, planning and interior design firm CetraRuddy has been invited to speak at a prestigious annual gathering of America’s leading architects in Las Vegas, from June 6-8 at the city’s convention center. The firm’s leaders, John Cetra, FAIA, and Eugene Flotteron, AIA, will present on multifamily residential design innovation as well as long-term vision for large-scale, high-potential areas to increase residential and commercial development.

In one of the talks, “Staten Island’s Master Planning for Transit & Housing Growth” on June 8th, Flotteron and Cetra will join Swiss transportation consultant Arnd Bätzner to discuss regional development for residential and commercial needs, and how these large-scale plans can enhance the character and economies of suburbs and exurbs. This case-study session, focused on New York City’s lowest-density borough, Staten Island, recounts how area officials are planning for its growth to 9 million inhabitants, with high-potential areas for increased mixed-use development. The concepts include mixed-use hubs at transportation nodes, adapted streetscapes, and innovative mass-transit options including an aerial transportation solution.

In addition, on June 6th John Cetra will reprise his sellout 2018 presentation on innovations in housing. The new talk, “Trends in Urban Living: New Approaches for Dense Multifamily Design,” brings together CetraRuddy with noted landscape architect Signe Nielsen, principal of Mathews Nielsen Landscape Architects, and developer Ric Guenther, senior vice president with Patrinely Group.

“Our goal is to discuss affordability, livability and project viability, which are top-of-mind concerns for proponents of better housing solutions around the United States,” says Cetra, the designer of such high-profile, award-winning projects as One Madison, 443 Greenwich, Walker Tower, and Patrinely’s much-touted 535W43, all in Manhattan. “Our multidisciplinary panel will illustrate better ways to address these issues and typological approaches in the real world, including with more open space, tower-podium forms, and adapted historic structures.”

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