Middleton, Wis. — The American Council of Engineering Companies annually recognizes significant achievement in engineering design. This year Mead & Hunt project teams were awarded four Engineering Excellence Awards from ACEC Wisconsin and two from ACEC national.

Mead & Hunt received a National Recognition Award from ACEC national and a Best of State Finalist Engineering Excellence Award from ACEC Wisconsin for their work on the Dane County Regional Airport snow removal equipment facility (http://meadhunt.com/news/msn-snow). The new 58,800-square-foot structure better centralizes operations for the tandem snow plows that clear the way for aircraft arrivals and departures. It has earned a LEED Gold certification due to several sustainable design features outperforming expectations.

For their design, project management and construction administration of the Montello Dam Spillway and Embankment Reconstruction (http://meadhunt.com/news/montello-acec), Mead & Hunt received a National Recognition Award from ACEC national and a Best of State Finalist Engineering Excellence Award. The Montello Dam, owned by the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources, was used to detour traffic during flooding in 2008, which led to the discovery of soft spots, sinkholes, erosion and general safety concerns. In its reconstruction, the vibrating beam slurry wall technique was used for the first time on a dam in Wisconsin.

The airfield safety improvement projects at General Mitchell International Airport (http://meadhunt.com/news/mke-acec-award) earned an Engineering Excellence Award from ACEC Wisconsin.  Mead & Hunt provided design and project management and served as the owner’s representative during construction. This was a complex, multi-phased project that included a feasibility study, an environmental assessment, and the design of multiple bid packages and construction administration services.

Mead & Hunt accepted an Engineering Excellence Award from ACEC Wisconsin for their planning, design, construction administration and environmental services for the University of Wisconsin-Madison stormwater project (http://meadhunt.com/news/uw-stormwater-award). This unique project is the first time four new engineered soil mixes are being used to reduce the amount of phosphorous entering nearby Lake Mendota and the Yahara watershed.

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