Analysis conducted by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has shown that window attachment products such as storm windows, shades, blinds, and films have the potential to save significant energy in homes and residential buildings. In older homes, window systems typically account for 25 percent of annual heating and cooling costs but can be responsible for as much as 40 percent. This means many homeowners are spending more money than necessary on heating and air conditioning.

An initiative supported by DOE, manufacturers, and researchers called the Attachment Energy Rating Council (AERC) rates, certifies and label the energy performance of window attachments. LARSON has led the way by certifying its interior and exterior storm window products, helping homeowners achieve energy savings and enhance the comfort of their homes.

Prior to the AERC certification program, homeowners did not have a rating system available to assist them in selecting energy-efficient window attachments, such as storm windows, blinds, shades, and films. “All homes use energy, but when homeowners buy products with the AERC Energy Improvement label, they can reduce their energy consumption while also adding comfort, protection, and privacy,” said AERC president John Crowley.

“Window attachments, which can be affordable alternatives to window replacements, can reduce heat loads and air conditioning bills when used properly,” said Alex Fitzsimmons, the Energy Department’s Acting Deputy Assistant Secretary for Energy Efficiency. “Building products like these can also help alleviate peak electricity demand on the grid when electricity is most expensive.”

AERC is an independent, third-party certification of the energy-saving potential of a product. Products certified by the AERC get rated on two types of performance: Cool Climate and Warm Climate. The Cool Climate rating indicates potential energy savings for home heating versus unprotected windows; the Warm Climate rating does the same for air conditioning. While the ratings are based on validated sophisticated software tools developed by DOE’s Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, the labels are intended to be easy to understand by consumers.

LARSON storm windows also recently received ENERGY STAR certification. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency estimates that on a national average, ENERGY STAR certified storm windows can save homeowners $350 on their annual heating and cooling bills when installed over single-pane clear glass windows.

LARSON’s AERC certified storm windows can be found online at www.larsondoors.com or wherever LARSON products are sold. AERC certified products and their ratings can also be found using the AERC Certified Product Search at www.aercenergyrating.org.

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